M. Petipa / Solymosi T. / Mirzoyan A. / Prokofieva I. / W. Forsythe / H. Lander / L. Minkus / L. Delibes / F. Schubert /

WITHOUT LIMITS

classic ballet

Ballet show in three acts

Without Limits. One classical and two neoclassical ballets that push the boundaries of achievability and demand superhuman performance and virtuosic technical skill from the dancers. The opening piece is the recently staged Paquita Suite, in which Albert Mirzoyan, Irina Prokofieva and Tamás Solymosi added new flavour to a pearl by the legendary choreographer Marius Petipa.

William Forsythe’s piece The Vertiginous Thrill of Exactitude was intended as a true homage to classical technique, and it is wedged between two pieces by George Balanchine, Sylvia Pas de Deux and Theme & Variations, both showcasing technique, its practice and mastering.

M. Petipa / Solymosi T. / Mirzoyan A. / Prokofieva I. / L. Minkus / É. Deldevez / L. Delibes / R. Drigo / D. Auber

Paquita-suite

Few works in classical ballet history have as many versions as the Paquita suite, also known as the Paquita Grand pas (classique). The new piece was created by Marius Petipa on the basis of the French ballet Paquita by working together with composer Ludwig Minkus to select the main musical numbers. Ever since the original premiere in Russia in 1882, the piece has used as many variations and solos, including additions from external sources, as dreamed up by the choreographer of the given production. In fact, a unique attribute of the piece is that the performing dancers often determine the numbers to dance or even perform choreographies prepared specifically for them.

George Balanchine / Léo Delibes

Sylvia Pas de Deux

William Forsythe / Franz Schubert

The Vertiginous Thrill of Exactitude

Although the works of American ballet dancer and choreographer William Forsythe use classical technique as their starting point, he is capable of thinking them through further, often taking them to the extreme. An example of this is his 11-minute piece The Vertiginous Thrill of Exactitude, created for three female and two male dancers. In it, solos, pas de deux, pas de trois and ensembles alternate, with no plot, to the virtuosic and sublime final movement of Schubert's (“Great”) Ninth Symphony. 
The work, which today is already considered one of the most challenging short ballets to perform, pays tribute to classical technique. Joining In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated, it is the second of Forsythe's pieces to make it into the Hungarian National Ballet's repertoire.


"Agile, ethereal and precise." (Krisztina Horeczky, Tánckritika.hu)


George Balanchine / Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Theme & Variations

The company of the Hungarian National Ballet performed the Neoclassical challenge [that is represented by Theme and Variations] with dancerly grace. (…) The elegant set was designed by István Rózsa, the costumes by Nóra Rományi, and the lighting design was the work of the ballet director, Tamás Solymosi." (Ira Werbowsky, Der neue Merker)

Events

Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
21 Volf Katalin season ticket
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
37. ifj. Harangozó Gyula season ticket
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
27. Pártay Lilla season ticket
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage