Opera Coctail

contemporary opera 12

May 5., Thursday 15:30

Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Closed

Ervin Lázár Programme

Mozart’s one-act theatre parody, Der Schauspieldirektor, shows how the life of a theatre director is certainly not an easy one when several singers are vying for the prima donna spot.
The second piece: The Telephone. A boy wants to confess his love to a girl, except the girl is next to the telephone, and any time it rings, she has to pick it up. Through a charming opera from the 1970s, the audience will get to see a problem that has since grown to serious proportions.

Details

Location
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Date
May 5, 2022
Start time
3:30 p.m.
End time
5 p.m.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Der Schauspieldirektor (The Impresario)

The singers are trampling over each other for positions in the company and attempting to squeeze as much cash as they can out of the director, who is (naturally) in a financial pickle and wondering what to perform at the theatre: “Put your hand on your heart: is it not true that the worst pieces bring us the most money, and masterpieces leave the auditorium empty?” A “patron” of Madame Silberklang promises to furnish the director with funds if he signs his favourite singer. The ladies indulge in a “singing competition”, with each of them delivering a bravura aria to show off their vocal virtuosity, and while both sing about serious subjects, each attempts to “out-sing” their rival. Then, in a trio, they hysterically try to surpass each other’s coloratura’s in order to prove which of them is the prima donna.

Composer
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Reorchestrated by
Péter Andorka
Prose after the libretto of Johann Gottlieb Stephanie by
Gergely Litkai
Hungarian lyrics
Miklós Szabó
Director
Máté Szabó
Set designer
Róbert Menczel
Costume designer
Ildikó Tihanyi

Gian Carlo Menotti

The Telephone

In the entire history of men asking women to marry them, anything that could go wrong has gone wrong at one time or another: the parents don't consent, the bride is in love with someone else, or perhaps the groom is, somebody dies, a war breaks out – the list goes on and on. An American fellow named Ben also runs into a hurdle as he attempts to pop the question. While his is not quite as dramatic as the ones enumerated above, those whose partners in life happen to be addicted to their telephones shouldn't be surprised by what it is. L’amour à trois.

By arrangement with G. Schirmer, INC. publisher and copyright owner.

Featuring the students of the Hungarian Dance Academy: Konrád Lukács KópiásErik Győrfi, Szabolcs BorbélyLevente Puczkó Smith, Márk Dávid AgárdiBence Kelemen, András Ordasi, Ruszlán Babácsi, Boglárka Pető, Viktória Katalin GalambosMálna Csató, Fanni Radványi 
Librettist
Gian Carlo Menotti
Translator
Klára Huszár
Director
András Almási-Tóth
Set designer
One Nikon
Costume designer
Krisztina Lisztopád
Choreographer
Klári Pataky

Events

Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage
Eiffel Art Studios – Miklós Bánffy Stage

Synopsis

Der Schauspieldirektor
The singers are trampling over each other for positions in the company and attempting to squeeze as much cash as they can out of the director, who is (naturally) in a financial pickle and wondering what to perform at the theatre: “Put your hand on your heart: is it not true that the worst pieces bring us the most money, and masterpieces leave the auditorium empty?” A “patron” of Madame Silberklang promises to furnish the director with funds if he signs his favourite singer. The ladies indulge in a “singing competition”, with each of them delivering a bravura aria to show off their vocal virtuosity, and while both sing about serious subjects, each attempts to “out-sing” their rival. Then, in a trio, they hysterically try to surpass each other’s coloratura’s in order to prove which of them is the prima donna.

The Telephone
Before leaving on a journey, Ben is paying a visit to Lucy, the object of his affection, and he's secretly got a big plan in the works: he's going to ask for the girl's hand in marriage. Whenever he gets to the big moment, however, the telephone rings, leading to a lengthy session of chattering on the part of his beloved. Out of desperation, Ben even attempts to sever the telephone cord, but in the end still doesn't manage to ask the momentous question: he has to leave in order to catch his train. Shortly after he departs, Lucy's telephone rings again. It's Ben. By calling from a telephone booth, he's finally able to ask Lucy to marry him, and she happily agrees. A love duet ensues – via telephone.

Reviews

[The Telephone] “This piece for two singers supplemented by a few dancers and a walking telephone is quite fun and, in the age of the smart phone, offers relevant entertainment.”  
Wolfgang Kutzschbach, Das Opernglas